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Archive for September, 2009

1907 Tuck New Year Postcard of Father Time,  Series 113

1907 Tuck New Year Postcard of Father Time, Series 113

It has been awhile since I’ve felt like sticking my nose in other people’s business (by reading vintage postcard messages).  Here’s an intriguing message from 1907 I found:

“…Have notified candidate to be at your home Monday, Dec. 30th, at 2 p.m.  I will be present also.  Should we not have two witnesses? …”

My first thought was, candidate for what?  There are sooo many answers to that question.  It most likely isn’t personal in nature as a nanny or member of the housekeeping staff would be.  The sender, C. Turner, and the recipient, Mrs. R. Legge, lived in two separate homes.  It is most likely some sort of public position; especially since C. Turner said he or she would be in attendance.  I wonder why witnesses would be needed?  And why 2?

Many more beautiful angel and new year postcards are available for sale in my store, Remember When Vintage Postcards.

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Today I will continue my series on ingenious novelty trade cards. You will read how die-cut trade cards went above and beyond other trade cards in their efforts to grab the customer’s attention with approaches not seen on other victorian trade cards.

Below is the third of 3 posts highlighting the various types of novelty trade cards.  See part 1 for my post on hold-to-light trade cards and part 2 for my post on metamorphic trade cards.

Die-cut

This type novelty trade card used its non-rectangular shape to attract the attention of customers.  The card was cut during production into various shapes; most often animals, palettes, and fans.  Die-cut trade cards cut into shapes resembling the product or it’s name, gained a further advantage in that the customer’s attention was more likely to be caught, and held longer, due to the irregular shape.

A-Corn Slave Die-cut Trade CardThis die-cut trade card was cut in the shape of the product’s name- an acorn for A-Corn Salve.

 

 

 

 

Holland Butter Die-cut Trade CardThis die-cut trade card was also cut into the shape of the product, Holland Creamery Butter, but added the irregular shape of a Dutch couple kissing.  Who wouldn’t want to try kissing??  For further information on Holland Creamery Butter, see Holland Butter Trade Card – 1912 Flashback.

Hecker's BuckWheat Die-cut Trade CardThis die-cut trade card used the irregular shape of a baby; an always popular image.  This particular trade card was a stand-up card, allowing further interaction by the customer.  For additional information on the Hecker Company, see Opposition to 1900 Flour Trust Reorganization.

 

 

 One thing a collector should be careful of when purchasing a die-cut trade card- closely inspect the back to make sure it wasn’t cut from a regular trade card for scrapbook purposes.

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One type of victorian trade card is the novelty trade card.  The advertisers on this type trade card were ingenious in their efforts to grab the customer’s attention.  By going beyond the normal rectangular trade card, they created a way for the customer to interact with the trade card.  This was an approach not tried on rectangular trade cards. 

Below you will find the second of 3 posts highlighting the various types of novelty trade cards.  See part 1 for my post on hold-to-light trade cards.

Metamorphic

This type novelty trade card had one or more flaps that changed the image when opened.  Most often, the expression or clothing changed.  Trade cards with top or side flaps are uncommon.  Multiple flap trade cards are scarce.

Many novelty trade cards used a “before and after” affect.  Some collectors believe only novelty trade cards showing the result of using the advertised product should be classified as having used this affect.  I believe that if a change results from manipulating the flap, it should be classified as having used the before and after affect.  It should not matter if the results of using an advertised product were shown or not.  The below metamorphic trade card is one that does show the results of using the advertised product, Buckingham’s Dye for Whiskers.

 

 Metamorphic Trade Card Before 

    Metamorphic Trade Card After

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

** Be sure to return for the third post in this series; die-cut trade cards.

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There are so many different types of colorful Victorian trade cards with great graphics to collect.  One such type is the novelty trade card.  The advertisers on this type trade card went above and beyond other trade cards in their efforts to grab the customer’s attention.  They created a way for the customer to interact with the trade card; an approach not tried on other trade cards. 

Below you will find the first of 3 posts highlighting the various types of novelty trade cards.

Hold-to-Light

This scarce type of novelty trade card was designed to join the back’s image with the front when held to the light.  The advertisers knew the image on the backs of hold-to-light trade cards had to be in reverse so they didn’t appear backwards when looked at from the front.  A backwards image would not have helped a product catch a customer’s eye.  

Hold-to-light trade cards were also printed on thin paper so the back images could show thru.  Unfortunately, this often times resulted in damage similar to the card you see below.  I guess there had to be a trade off to accomplish an advertiser of this type novelty trade card’s goal – to grab and keep a customer’s attention.
Hecker's HTL Trade Card Front

Hecker's Self-Rising Buckwheat Trade Card

  Hecker's HTL Trade Card Back

Hecker's HTL Trade Card Close-up

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(If interested, I posted a note on the Heckers Company on my facebook page – Opposition to 1900 Flour Trust Reorganization.  To return to this post after reading, just close the window.)

Be sure to return for the second post in this series; metamorphic trade cards.

 

 

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Radisson Hotel Advertising Postcard

Today’s venture into history will be a tour of the downtown Hotel Radisson, Minneapolis.  Our tour begins with the death of Albert Johnson.  Who is Albert Johnson?  You see, Albert owned a huge chunk of Minneapolis real estate.  It was inherited by Edna Dickerson upon his death.  She was convinced by prominent area business people to invest her inheritance (to the tune of $1.5 million) in an upscale hotel venture.  Minneapolis’ newest business was born, thanks to Albert.

Our next stop is at the infancy of the Hotel Radisson, named after Minnesota’s forgotten explorer Frenchman Pierre Esprit Radisson.  Construction began in mid-1908.  Steel sheet pilings were used; one of the first buildings in the US to use this construction method.  The Radisson’s owners were progressive thinkers for sure.

Our third stop of our tour is at the delayed opening of the downtown Radisson, Minneapolis in December, 1909.  This newly constructed, 16-story hotel was the second tallest building in Minneapolis’ skyline at the time.  The Hotel Radisson, Minneapolis included 425 rooms; most of which had bathrooms.  Yes, you read correctly.  Rooms without bathrooms cost a $1.50; with one, $2.50 (a far cry from the current $79).

This is the end of our tour.  I will leave you with some trivia about this hotel gem.  A library was off the lobby.  When the Radisson opened, it could not serve alcohol (that came later in 1911).  Lastly, 50 female staff and chefs lived in the hotel.  Sadly, the downtown Radisson Hotel, Minneapolis closed in late 1981.  It was razed in early 1982. 

I hope you enjoyed your tour.  If so, please click on the bookmark button to the right.

** You can find many more wonderful postcards with great graphics in my store, Remember When Vintage Postcards.

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Ahhh, a sender who’s a tease.  OK, I’ll bite.  My curiosity is picked.  Guess what?

This message would certainly draw attention to it for curiosity’s sake alone.  Maybe that was the sender’s intention.  He or she could have felt Mrs. Hartman wasn’t writing enough.  Curiosity would get Mrs. Hartman to write just to find out the answer.  At any rate, the brief message opens up a whole lot of possibilities as to what person or thing was being guessed about.  Care to take a crack at this one?

1908 P. Sander St. Patrick's Day Postcard

1908 P. Sander St. Patrick's Day Postcard

 

St. Patrick's Day Couple Postcard Back

 

 

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Black Boy Victorian Trade Card

Frazer's Axle Grease Victorian Trade Card Sold by E. Creed of Boone, IA

The 2nd week in August, I posted pictures of funny victorian trade cards.  One of them involved a black boy stealing a skinny dipping white boy’s clothes.  The subsequent searches for stealing black boy and similar terms increased, so thought I would feature it today.

 

On the surface, it is funny.  Look deeper.  The stereotype of the black person as simple-minded children, incapable of caring for themselves, was alive and flourishing at the time this trade card was published (late 19th century).  Yet , this victorian trade card publisher depicted the black boy as  cunning and smart enough to know when to steal the clothes (when the white boy was at a disadvantage).  It is good that not all people believed in the black stereotype in victorian times.

** You can find more victorian trade cards with great graphics and color in my store, Remember When Vintage Postcards.

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