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Posts Tagged ‘antique postcard’

I have spent the Labor Day weekend so far cleaning house instead of catching up on season 2 of Revenge, or reading a favorite romance novel over again (for the fourth time) out on my patio. Yes, cleaning house; a thankless job with an endless loop. It is therefore appropriate that I came across the first of two postcard messages.

Easter Postcard Fairy Chariot

Vintage Easter postcard – Fairy Drives Cracked Egg Chariot Pulled By Chicks

“Will write you a letter later. I am in a hurry. am going to wash & scrub to-day. I guess we’re not going to have any summer.”

I wonder why the sender was in a hurry?  It could be as simple as wanting to get the “wash & scrub” over with as soon as possible.   I can certainly sympathize with the lack of summer comment.  Today was a beautiful day – sunny, no rain, low 70s, and non-humid for once.  I’ll give you 3 guesses why I spent not a minute outside enjoying it, and the first two don’t count.

On to my second antique postcard message to Miss Fannie Brand of Iowa…

New Year Postcard Money Cone

1910 Antique New Year Postcard – Overflowing Lucky Coins, Mushrooms, Horseshoes.

“I hope you are not living on starvation rations any longer and that you can talk loudly and long whether you do or not.  Hoping this will prove the best of New Years.”

The phrase “starvation rations” caught my eye.  I plugged the phrase into bing.  I learned “rationing”, and “making do” weren’t new concepts to the 1940s.  Rationing also occurred in the first decade of the 20th century.  With the lead-up to World War 1, food was being diverted to feed soldiers.  Immigration to the US was on the rise.  Let us hope Fannie was no longer on starvation rations when she received the above antique postcard.

Both postcard messages did without something – freedom to enjoy summer or leisure time in the first message, and food in the second message.  How sad.

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“Hello Harry.  We have given up football I I guess.  I had some time Thursday night.  Was over south of slater.  She ask all about you.  Will explain all when you come home.  We had a baseball workout last night I think.  We will fall or they fall from 11-2.”

The Fair Weather Fan

I read the above antique postcard message recently, which mentioned giving up football.  I know a little of how the writer must have felt.  Professional football has just started, and already I can’t wait for the humiliation to be over with.  My team, the Vikings, are 0-2 so far this pre-season.  OK, I’ll admit it.  I’m a fair weather Vikings fan.  Maybe I’ll change; maybe not.  I don’t think the writer would’ve been a fair weather fan though with an attitude of “we fall or they fall”.

Football, then Romance

The above message also mentioned a certain female someone asking after Mr. Harry Harrison of Toledo, Iowa – the recipient of the antique postcard.  Her name wasn’t mentioned, so we can only assume Harry knew whom the writer was referring to.  Let’s hope his bubble (romantic?) wasn’t busted when the writer explained all regarding that female someone.  I tend to think not as she cared enough to ask after Harry.

1912 Antique Bathing Beauty Postcard artist signed by C. Ryan

1912 Antique Bathing Beauty Postcard artist signed by C. Ryan

(Many more antique postcards, including artist signed, can be found in my store – Remember When Vintage Postcards.)

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Colonial-Thanksgiving-Postcard-Children_FB

Antique thanksgiving postcard. Postmarked 1911, Kelly Station PA.

I was about to post a thanksgiving antique postcard on my website, http://www.rememberwhenpostcards.com, when I thought, “why not read the message?”  Lucky I did, as I discovered a reference to something I hadn’t heard of before – a leap year party.  The message read as follows:

“Hello Orga:  Robert and I were up at Crisnans last night playing cards.  John is well so far as I know but he is very sorry he didn’t get telling you good bye.  We are having a Xmas entertainment at Brick Church  We are going to have a leap year party and mebby someone will get John.”

According to folk tradition, a woman was granted the privilege of proposing marriage to a man, instead of the other way around, only during leap year.  If the man refused, he owed the woman compensation in the form of a gown and kiss, or gloves – provided she was wearing a scarlet petticoat.  Sounds vaguely like the tradition of the Sadie Hawkins dance.

The “ladies privilege” tradition explains the reference to “getting John”.  Poor John.  I don’t think the socially acceptable venue of a church party will help John.  I hope he had an account at the local millinery (clothing) store.

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I was sooo excited two weeks ago.  I had found the 6th (and final) antique cupid postcard in a series published by PFB!  Granted, three of the six weren’t brilliant (gold trim).  I was still very happy to know what the image was on the last postcard to find.  It was of a cupid with fairy wings standing on the shoulders of another cupid with bird like angel wings trying to reach a clover on a small rock cliff.  So darling!  I have posted images of all six antique postcards for my blog’s readers.  Enjoy these treasured members of my personal postcard collection!

PFB Cupid Postcards CPFB Cupid Postcards B

PFB Cupid Postcards A

If anyone knows who the artist is for this series, I would be interested to know.

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Below is a curious message I found on the back of an 1908 antique bathing beauty postcard.  It reads:

“Dear Edna
be sure and send my coat when you send my machine,  got your letter yesterday.  Will write later
Anna”

 

Bathing Beauty Postcard Piggy Back Child

1908 Bathing Beauty Postcard with UDB

Bathing Beauty Postcard Piggy Back Bk

What I’m curious about is the type of machine Anna wants sent thru the mail.  The time period and gender of the sender suggests perhaps a sewing machine.  However, peddle sewing machines were quite large.  Was the post office in 1908 equipped to mail an item the size and weight of a sewing machine?

Could there be another machine small enough to mail thru the post office?  What do you think?

Be sure to stop back on August 16th when I share an exciting find for my personal postcard collection.

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I was sooo excited to buy several Halloween postcards for listing in my web store at the recent 2011 Land Of Lakes Postcard and Paper Show.  One was of a witch sitting on a moon with a white owl.  Such a striking image.  I was curious what an owl’s connection was to Halloween.  I found a blog post entitled Birdlife: Spooky Myths About Owls that explained the connection.  I thought you might find it interesting.

Halloween Postcard - Owl and Witch Together on Moon

October 1911 Halloween Postcard of Witch on Crescent Moon With White Owl

Be sure to stop back on August 8th for the next installment of “Then and Now” Postcards. It was a sad ending for the featured building.

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Going beyond an antique or vintage postcard’s image can sometimes lead to some of the juiciest historical tidbits.  Insert a couple of quick eyebrow raises.  A rather stilted recitation of Manchester, NH  history (but still a good source of historical info), was where I found my juicy tidbits this time – Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH – History and Genealogy .

Antique train postcard of Manchester, NH railroad station

Antique train postcard of Manchester, NH railroad station

The page starts out in 1604, but let’s jump to 1839.  You ask, “What happened in September, 1839?”  I’ll tell you.  Jeremiah Johnson was killed by Elbridge Ford.  Elbridge was tried the next year and found guilty of manslaughter.  He was sentenced to five years in prison, but pardoned after three; not much justice for Jeremiah.  Why was this murder notable?  The page’s entry just previous to this tells of a vote to establish a system of police – in October, 1839!  There is nothing like a murder to light a fire under a town’s butt.  Unfortunately, this was too late for poor Jeremiah.

Let’s jump ahead to 1853 to when Bayley, Blood, and Company, or Vulcan Works, was established.  Sorry Trekki fans, no relation to Spock.  In 1854, Vulcan Works became Manchester Locomotive Works.  By 1875, Manchester Locomotive Works had turned out 786 locomotives (beyond capacity).  That’s a lot of trains.  I wonder if any of them are still around.

Where does Levi come into this story?  Around 1873, Levi Strauss started making what became their famous “blue jeans” or riveted clothing.  The denim for them was made at Manchester’s Amoskeag Manufacturing Company.  Cool.

* You can find more railroad station postcards in my store, Remember When Vintage Postcards.

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