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Archive for January, 2010

I recently became a member of a postcard forum called Postcard Collector.org. It’s a great place to learn about postcards as well as share your knowledge of them.

One of the discussions was about C. Klein.  It contained a lot of information on this artist I’ve not read elsewhere (i.e. her real name and birthplace, how to distinguish between her earlier work and later work, etc).  As she is a popular postcard artist, I thought my blog’s readers might be interested to read this discussion as well.

This vintage postcard is a later example of Catharina Klein's work as the signature isn't underlined.

 (This is another example from the 900 postcard lot I recently bought.)

Many more beautiful bird postcards and artist signed postcards can be found in my store, Remember When Vintage Postcards.

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1945 Real Photo Postcard of Bartender at the Silver Dollar Bar

This postcard was part of a 900 postcard lot I recently bought; the same lot the ice palace photo postcards came from.  It’s the bartender at Knott’s Berry Farm’s Silver Dollar Bar, which is part of their “Living Ghost Town” in California.  There are several more fascinating photo postcards  of this ghost town on their web site.  Enjoy your travel thru history!

Weekly Trivia:

Mr. Knott named the boysenberry after Mr. Boysen, who developed it in 1932.  It is a cross between a loganberry, blackberry, and raspberry.  Why would someone want to cross those three berries?

Many more wonderful photo postcards can be found in my store, Remember When Vintage Postcards.

Note:  Marie over at The French Factrice blog is hosting Postcard Friendship Fridays.  Hop on over to Marie’s and check out all the postcard enthusiasts sharing this week. 

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Clark's ONT Cotton Thread Trade CardI missed last week’s weekly ephemera trivia, so thought I’d catch up with this blog post.

It’s Napoleon’s Fault

Ever wonder where the expression, “the bogey man is coming to get you!” came from?  It turns out Napoleon is responsible. 

Napoleon’s nickname “bogey” (from Bonaparte – boney to bogey) resulted from an act of revenge.  He blockaded Britain’s coast in the very early 1800’s due to the defeat of his fleet at Trafalgar.  This resulted in the serious depletion of imported silk thread in Britain.  The price of smuggled silk thread skyrocketed.  That was naughty Napoleon.  We women needed that silk thread for all those pretty Victorian fashions.

Weekly Ephemera Trivia:

Patrick Clark came to the rescue of British ladies by inventing hand sewing thread (2-4 cord) from a material readily available – cotton.  Patrick’s grandson, George, later invented a six-cord thread strong enough for sewing machines (circa mid-1800).  It was called ONT, which stood for “Our New Thread”. 

(Information from Sewalot.com)

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I’ve just realized it’s St. Paul Winter Carnival time again.  This Minnesota winter sports carnival officially kicked off this past Thursday.  Great timing because I just bought a 900 postcard lot that contained four St. Paul Winter Carnival Photo Postcards of the 1938, 1939, and 2 of the 1940 Ice Palaces (one illuminated).  It’s exciting when I find postcards, in lots or on buying trips, that have a personal connection.  My Dad used to take me to see the ice palaces when I was little and they were still being built.

For those that would like a little background on these wonderful ice palaces, please read my earlier blog post – 1941 St. Paul Winter Carnival Ice Palace Postcard.

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1938 Ice Court Real Photo Postcard

   1939 Ice Palace Real Photo Postcard

1940 Ice Palace Real Photo Postcard

1940 Ice Palace Real Photo Postcard - Illuminated

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Yes, it’s been quite awhile since I’ve posted anything on this postcard and Victorian trade card blog.  I’ve been going thru a “work is a naughty word” period.  Guess that qualifies me for membership in the Knights of the Dog House organization.

Where Was This Dog House Arcade Card Found?

The posted image isn’t an antique or vintage postcard, but a piece of ephemera called an arcade card.  Arcade cards were the same size as postcards, had blank backs, and were made of thicker card stock.  Arcade cards were obtained from penny vending machines usually found in amusement arcades (hence the name).

I recently had the fortune to see one of these penny vending machines being offered for sale in an antique shop I visited while on my recent birthday trip.  It stood on a stand like a gumball machine, but had no clear window where the cards could be seen.  Instead, the metal box was covered in advertisements.Dog House Membership Arcade Card  The arcade cards came out the bottom, similar to small boxes of detergent in laundromats.  What a treat to see a part of popular 1930’s history I’d only read about before.

** For those who are curious, this membership card reads:

“This is to Certify that _____ has been elected an Active Member of the Kinights of the Dog House, a national organization established for those who are without honor at certain times in their own homes.  The Board of Directors has investigated the qualifications of the applicant and from evidence submitted conclude that he will make a worthy member…”

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Sigh. I'm feeling a little old. You see, it's my 50th birthday today.

Considering everything that's happened to me in the past 50 years (go ahead & ask), I guess I should celebrate making it this far, but .....

 

I've decided to run away to a luxury resort and spa in Lake Geneva, WI instead. That way my daughter can't tease me about being an "old fart".

Once there, I will catch up on my sleep while covered in Egyptian cotton sheets .....

Wear those new togs I bought at Goodwill when dining in a 5-star Italian restaurant (I hope the male waiters are cute) .....

Make use of my bifocals by reading "Lost Symbol" by Dan Brown. It's a BIG book.....

And float down an indoor lazy river on an inner tube in the middle of winter. Ahhhh. What fun to have no responsibilities.

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Rotten Row in the Season, Tuck Oilette No. 7257

 

Rotten Row is a sand-covered avenue maintained as a bridleway running along the south side of Hyde Park in London that allows Londoners to ride in the centre of London.  This is the place referred to in all those saucy period romance novels many of us women read. 

Some believe the name comes from the word “rotten”, the soft material that covers the bridleway.  At its height of use in the 18th century, Rotten Row was a fashionable place for upper-class Londoners to be seen. 

Weekly Ephemera Trivia: 

William III lit the avenue with 300 oil lamps in 1690 creating Britain’s first artificially lit highway. 

Note:  Marie over at The French Factrice blog is hosting Postcard Friendship Fridays.  Hop on over to Marie’s and check out all the postcard enthusiasts sharing this week.  

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